There is a lawn mower that runs on batteries: how much does it cost and how does it work

There is a lawn mower that runs on batteries: how much does it cost and how does it work

A battery-powered lawn mower is the latest addition to Ego, a company that is part of China’s Chervon, a giant with sales of more than 1 billion dollars, at the forefront of the development of wireless technology and which in Italy is distributed exclusively by Brumar. The Z6 tractor can in fact be equipped with lithium batteries up to 6 56 V, which allows it to provide the power and performance of a 22 HP gasoline lawn mower and mow a lawn of more than 12,000 m2 (about 25 tennis courts). ) on a single charge.

In addition to the indisputable advantages in terms of sustainability and reduction of noise pollution characteristic of cordless tools, the lawn mower is very easy to steer, with two levers that allow it to operate at “zero distance”, as if it had the tracks. . In addition, the cutting height varies between 2.5 cm and 10 cm and there are three different options to manage the cut: side discharge, mulching (the grass is chopped finely and thrown back onto the lawn where it serves as compost) or collecting.

The price? From 4,999 euros including batteries for 15 Ah (1 x 10 Ah and 1 x 5 Ah). Batteries that can be mounted on the entire range of Ego garden tools that, as we said, made wireless their flagship.

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In this regard, the company presented a survey that examined the use of gardening equipment in UK counties. As a result, more than 89% of the tools used run on gasoline, for a total consumption of more than 600,000 liters of fuel/year. These tools are used to maintain public spaces, parks and even school playgrounds. Tests carried out on the emissions produced show that they consume significant amounts of gasoline compared to an average car and, in some cases, even exceed the allowable levels of particulate matter.

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